Ajamu Nangwaya's blog

Caribbean Reparations Movement Must Put Capitalism on Trial

by Ajamu Nangwaya

The English-speaking Caribbean is seeking reparations for slavery from the colonial powers. But why stop there? “If we are going to throw the book at capitalism for chattel slavery, we are morally and politically obligated to do the same for the wage slavery of capitalism under which the Caribbean working-class is currently being exploited.” Reparations should be used to build people power in the region, ultimately to overthrow capitalism.

Can the Black Panthers Offer Jamaicans Lessons on Checking Police Violence?

by Ajamu Nangwaya

The Caribbean is the source of many voices of liberation -- Franz Fanon, Walter Rodney, Kwame Toure, Bob Marley -- but Jamaica, in particular, might do well to study the experience of the Black Panther Party, which began as an armed cop-watch program. Tivoli Gardens, where police killed 70 people in 2010, would also “be in full agreement with Franz Fanon’s articulation of the role of the police.”

The Fall of a Right-Wing Black Canadian Politician

by Ajamu Nangwaya

The unraveling of Sen. Don Meredith’s political career has nothing to do with Black “progress” in Canada. As a loyal member of the Conservative Party, Meredith supports mining interests that exploit Africa and, domestically, “is not on record opposing any of the anti-people laws of the right-wing regime in Ottawa.”

Why are Y’all So Excited Over Mayor Tory’s Call for an "End" to Carding by the Cops?

by Ajamu Nangwaya

In response to widespread public protest, the mayor of Toronto’s largest city announced a reversal of his support for “carding,” Canada’s version stop-and-frisk. But Mayor John Tory’s alternative appears to be nothing but a sanitized version of the old practice. “Afrikan people would love the cops to just stay away from them, if they are not suspected of committing a criminal offense.”

“Am I free to go?”: The Refuseniks’ Campaign to Resist Police Street Harassment

by Ajamu Nangwaya

“Carding,” Toronto’s version of stop-and-frisk, is opposed by a huge and growing proportion of the city’s population, as well as influential actors among the corporate elite. Yet, the local police oversight body “has given the cops a virtual license to carry out street harassment and racial profiling.” What’s needed are neighborhood-based structures “to permanently organize against the violent behavior and street harassment of the cops.”

Dump “Carding” into the Cesspool of History by Refusing to Talk to the Cops

by Ajamu Nangwaya

In the U.S., it’s called “stop-and-frisk.” In Canada, it’s called “carding,” a practice that “should be cast into the cesspool of history through a mass refusal carding campaign that organizes Afrikans, other racialized peoples, Indigenous peoples, and the white working-class.” Just as importantly, “we need supportive programs to defend members of the community when they assert their right to not give the requested information to the police.”

Toronto’s 1992 Yonge Street Uprising: Afrikan Resistance to State/Police Violence

by Ajamu Nangwaya

The Yonge Street rebellion was very much in the mold of Black America’s urban uprisings, sparked by police abuse. The disturbances led to a spate of reforms, some of which were later reversed by a right-wing provincial regime. Corporate media and the political establishment “saw the Yonge Street Uprising as an exercise in hooliganism, criminality and/or opportunism by wayward elements in Toronto.”

Exuberant Irrationality Driving Afrikan-Canadians’ Support for Deputy Police Chiefs

by Ajamu Nangwaya

The late Maya Angelou supported Clarence Thomas for U.S. Supreme Court Justice, because he’s Black. Afro-Canadians are making the same mistake in endorsing two Black cops for police chief in the nation’s largest city, Toronto. Both Black officers are supporters of “carding,” the Canadian version of stop-and-frisk.

Malcolm X’s Internationalism and the Struggle for Liberation in Haiti Today

by Ajamu Nangwaya

Malcolm X sought international unity among the non-white world based on the “common experience of colonialism and white supremacy.” If he were alive today, Malcolm “would encourage people outside of Haiti to stand with the people of Haiti.”

Police Violence in Black Toronto: Cops Act Like “Military Police in Occupied Territories”

by Ajamu Nangwaya

The Jane and Finch community is the epicenter of Black Toronto and, not coincidentally, the most intensive arena of police abuse. In Canada, “carding” is the equivalent of U.S. stop-and-frisk. “If the people are able to win victory on the issue of carding, it might build their resolve and confidence to take on other structural or oppressive economic and social issues.”

Transform your Global Justice Sentiments into Action to End the Military Occupation of Haiti

by Ajamu Nangwaya

On October 14, the UN Security Council extended the armed occupation of Haiti. The world body has been allowed to trample Haiti’s sovereignty and dignity “without significant mobilization and opposition from peace, global justice and international solidarity activists and organizations.” This article includes detailed instructions and advice on how to help end the UN’s crimes against the Haitian people.

High Time to Build a Movement of Solidarity to End the UN’s Occupation of Haiti

by Ajamu Nangwaya

For ten years the people of Haiti have been subjected to foreign rule and denial of their most basic human rights. Solidarity with Haiti must be expressed in action. “We need to be nimble and swift in putting together initiatives demanding an immediate withdrawal of the UN’s army of occupation.”

“Organization is the Weapon of the Oppressed”: Ferguson, Mobilization and Organizing the Resistance!

by Ajamu Nangwaya

Event mobilizations may catch media attention, but history’s big footprints are left by large numbers of organized people moving in the same direction. “Our solidarity in action will emerge from us getting together in groups with a program of liberation.”

Developing a Constituency for Anti-imperialist Pan-Afrikan Solidarity

by Ajamu Nangwaya

Afrikan Liberation Day must be more than a celebration of “flag” independence. The event should be a focus of work to complete the unfinished process of liberation from both the neocolonialists and “the kleptocrats and strongmen who masquerade as a national bourgeoisie” who “drain the lifeblood out of the laboring classes across Afrika.”

We Have an Anti-imperialist Obligation to the People of Haiti

by Ajamu Nangwaya

The arc of justice is made to bend through solidarity with the oppressed. Solidarity with Haiti means fighting for an end to “the cycle of Western military interventions, coups and/or propping up of anti-democratic, anti-people regimes; and an end to the local elite’s and foreign capital’s exploitation of the people.”

Reject Obama's Personal Responsibility Snake-Oil

by Ajamu Nangwaya

In The Mind of Obama, white supremacy, sexism and capitalist exploitation are nonexistent or merely minor hurdles that can be overcome through personal responsibility and discipline. The First Black U.S. Presidentis under the illusion that his occupation of the White House is an indication of a new and better day across America.”

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