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Occupations: Wall Street, Washington – and Newark

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    A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

    It is the season of “occupations” – open-ended protests designed to “liberate” very finite bits of space that represent a larger world that has been alienated from humanity by the greedy grasp of a usurping class.” Three somewhat different occupations hope to “set off a chain of human reaction” that will wrest power from the denizens of Wall Street and their servants in Washington. Meanwhile, Newark, New Jersey, activists are busy occupying their own turf.

     

    Occupations: Wall Street, Washington – and Newark

    A Black Agenda Radio commentary by Glen Ford

    The conditions that are inflicted on the people of Newark and every other American inner city have their source in those who rule from Washington in the service of Wall Street – the sites of those other occupations.”

    Three “occupations” of significance are underway or about to begin in the United States. These people’s actions share overlapping themes of resistance to the oppression of the many by the few, and attempt to focus the minds of the many on very finite bits of space that represent a larger world that has been alienated from humanity by the greedy grasp of a usurping class. It is hoped that the symbolic liberation of those spaces, through physical occupation by the people, will set off a chain of human reaction culminating in a kind of Big Bang that gives birth to a new social universe.

    Big Bangs have happened before; human progress depends on them, which is why people spend their entire lives trying to light the fuse.

    The attempt to occupy ground on Manhattan’s Wall Street, the figurative and literal belly of the global finance capitalist beast, has been harassed and, increasingly, brutalized by police – as must occur if the protest is to crystallize into a narrative of struggle. The Wall Street protesters appear to be as they describe themselves, a “leaderless resistance” that is united against the “greed and corruption” of the “one percent” of the population that lords it over the rest of us. The protesters were, at least in the beginning, very young, very white, and transparently upscale in social background – just the kind of cohort in need of introduction to the blunt instruments underpinning the rule of the rich. The NYPD soon obliged them.

    The protesters were, at least in the beginning, very young, very white, and transparently upscale in social background.”

    On October 6, a coalition of organizations with many veteran leaders will descend on Freedom Square in Washington, DC, for an open-ended, non-violent occupation of federal space. Drawn from social and economic justice, environmental and peace groups, the activists say they “will demand changes that shift power away from concentrated corporate capital and free us to create solutions that lead to a just and sustainable future.”

    In Newark, New Jersey, the People’s Organization for Progress, or P.O.P., has launched a different kind of occupation, claiming public space at two busy intersections of the city for daily demonstrations that they plan to continue for 381 days, the duration of the 1955 Montgomery, Alabama, bus boycott. P.O.P. is, in my estimation, the most effective grassroots, Black-based outfit in the country, with hundreds of dues paying members and many more active associates. The demands of their “People’s Daily Action for Peace, Jobs, Equality and Justice” are as comprehensive as those of a national organization – as they must be, since the conditions that are inflicted on the people of Newark and every other American inner city have their source in those who rule from Washington in the service of Wall Street – the sites of those other occupations.

    The activists in Newark are intent on occupying public space in their own city, for more than a year or as long as necessary. That is the most profound kind of occupation: a non-stop mobilization of people embedded in their own communities, yet consciously connected to the larger world. A struggle in which there will be no change of venue, until all the people’s venues are liberated.

    For Black Agenda Radio, I’m Glen Ford. On the web, go to BlackAgendaReport.com.

    BAR executive editor Glen Ford can be contacted at Glen.Ford@BlackAgendaReport.com.

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    Don’t Let george Soros Hijack the Movement!

    An Emergency Program for the Anti-Wall Street Protestors

    By Webster G. Tarpley, Ph.D.

    http://tarpley.net/2011/09/29/emergency-program-for-anti-wall-street-pro...

    Despite what Tarpley says

    Despite what Tarpley says about Union Bureaucrats, the support of Unions sucha SEIU greatly stregnthens the Wall Street protests. How is ACORN a part of the Obama machine?  ACORN president Bertha Lewis denounced Obama for abandoning ACORN over the Breitbart videos and it was a great organization.

    What evidence does Tarpley have that Michael Moore is unpopular among the occupation movement? Michael Moore and Susan Surandan aren't agents for anyone and aren't seeking publicity for themselves. They are just supporting a good cause that they believe in.  Matt Taibbi is hardly just a "self appointed" expert on Wall Street. He has relentlessley documented Wall Streets abuses and how they have hurt the American public.

    The Robin Hood Tax

    Around the world, momentum is building behind a tiny tax on bankers that could generate billions of dollars to help with problems at home and overseas.

    http://www.oxfam.org/en/campaigns/health-education/robin-hood-tax

    New York's $16 Billion Gift to Wall Street Banksters

    The Spectulator’s Rebate

    by RALPH NADER

    http://www.counterpunch.org/2010/08/06/the-spectulator-s-rebate/

    Don't let Obama hijack the movement!

    World Crisis Radio:

    October 1, 2011 program

    http://tarpley.net/world-crisis-radio/

    THE FIVE DOLLAR SOLUTION

    In an attempt to shore up their profits, Bank of America announced that, next year, it will begin charging a $5.00 monthly fee for the "priveledge" of using a debit card to access one's own accounts when one shops.  In reality, it costs them pennies to conduct such transactions. Other big banks, which are not doing small loans anymore (in spite of taking billions of taxpayer money in the form of TARP funds) are expected to follow suit if BofA pulls it off. The best most effective form of protest against these pigs would be to put your money, if you have any, into credit unions or local banks which treat "little" consumers as it having their business actually matters. Never pay someone to abuse you.

    This is exactly why I'm

    This is exactly why I'm quitting B of A this month. I have a checking, savings and credit card with them and am ready to move on. I should have quit Bank of America when my identity was stolen a year ago, but I somehow held on. It took them nearly 8 months to determine which charges were fraudulent and which weren't, which I had itemized for them... Basically, anything not purchased in or around Atlanta wasn't me...you know, all those Russian and Thailand purchases. Well in the meantime while B of A was doing nothing, my credit score took a huge hit and I've had to work on credit repair since then so I can get a used car loan. I've been thinking about switching to Schwab since I hear there are no fees, but maybe a credit union? The only thing I'm sure about is dropping B of A$$holes ASAP.—DeAndre

    Capitalism doesn't work. Period.

    If aspirin worked great for 5% of the population and for the other 95% had effects varying from doing nothing at all to making their headache worse to killing them outright I doubt very many people would have a problem admitting that aspirin sucks. So why the cognitive dissonance regarding capitalism in the minds of so many Americans? Not at B.A.R. mind you, I mean most of the people one meets out in public. Is it because most Americans are:
    a.) brainwashed
    b.) cowardly
    c.) stupid as a sackful of hammers
    d.) all of the above?

    I lean towards "d."

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