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Anthony Monteiro's blog

Amiri Baraka: Class Struggle and Cultural Revolution

by Anthony Monteiro

Amiri Baraka, the poet/activist who was laid to rest in his native Newark, New Jersey, last Saturday, came to understand 40 years ago that all art is ideological. “It is the courageous move from cultural nationalism to Cultural Revolution that liberated Baraka, and ultimately us, to understand the democratic and revolutionary possibilities inherent in our artistic and cultural traditions.”

Amiri Baraka Has Died: Long Live Baraka

by Anthony Monteiro

To truly honor Amiri Baraka, one must examine his travels, the political journeys he undertook in search of paths to self-determination for his people and all humanity. He sought a liberatory synthesis of culture and politics. “We need a Cultural Revolution in the US and internationally, to reorient the world and ultimately transform it where we and everybody else is self-determining.”

The African National Congress: The Rise and Tragic Fall of a Revolutionary Movement

by Anthony Monteiro

Black “rule” in South Africa is illusory. “White supremacy without the obvious hand of white people is the form of social and political control, which replaces legal apartheid.” The revolution was derailed. “The road from the Freedom Charter, to the Morogoro Consultative Conference, to the 1994 elections, to the murder of 34 miners at Mirikana in 2012, is the ANC’s road to counter-revolution.”

Nelson Mandela, Free Market Capitalism and the South African Crisis

by Anthony Monteiro

The veil must be lifted from the deliberations and machinations that led Nelson Mandela and the African National Congress to discard the people’s Freedom Charter in favor of an accommodation with white capital, in the early Nineties. Why, at South Africa’s most critical juncture, did the ANC make a pact with the Devil? And why did they keep it?

Nelson Mandela, The Contradictions Of His Life And Legacies

by Anthony Monteiro

Nelson Mandela lived a long life, with 3 careers, one before he was locked up, another while in prison, and a third after his 1990 release. Dr. Anthony Monteiro reflects upon the life, the lessons and the legacies of Nelson Mandela.

All Praise and Revolutionary Homage to Pam Africa: Our Daughter of the Dust

by Anthony Monteiro

At last, a song for an unsung heroine of the Freedom Movement. Pam Africa is the irresistible force and immovable object of the movement to free Mumia Abu Jamal. “She fought several of Mumia's lawyers whose liberalism and belief in the system inhibited their capacity to fight for his freedom and to see the possibilities of connecting what goes on in the courts to what goes on in the streets.” Mumia’s live exit from death row “would have been impossible without the movement and without Pam Africa herself.”

The Existential Crisis of U.S. Capitalism

The Existential Crisis of U.S. Capitalism


Corporate media, which never warned that capitalism was in crisis before the financial meltdown, now insists that the system is simply in a down period, and will at some point return to stability. But the crisis became inevitable precisely because “the most predatory, parasitic and criminal elements of Wall Street and bank capital became dominant over the economy and the government.” With these same elements still firmly in charge, how can the future be anything but chaotic?



From Du Bois to Obama: African American Intellectuals in the Public Forum

booker vs du bois

by Anthony Monteiro


Elite educational institutions are turning out a bumper crop of neo-liberal Black intellectuals who are anything but “new.” Charles Pete Banner-Haley has much more in common with Booker T. Washington than the iconic Black intellectual and activist, W.E.B. Du Bois. “A new talented tenth” has emerged from mostly white universities, “which attempts to straddle the ideological divide between Booker T. Washington and Du Bois. They claim Du Bois in words, but substantively are Bookerites.”



The Current Economic Crisis and the Way Out

piglet banker

by Anthony Monteiro


Wall Street rule has created a kind of “vampire economy,” a parasite on the “real” economy of work and production. Government acts as servant to the plunderers, deeming them “too big to fail” and bailing them out “to the tune of $12 trillion” of the people’s money. Although progressive white economists like Joseph Stiglitz often “don’t get it,” liberating the “masses of black folk from the plunderous combination of white supremacy and finance capitalism is fundamental to solving the crisis.”



Black Power, Barack Obama and Peniel E. Joseph’s Defense of American Democracy

by Anthony Monteiro

Corporate media (and corporate academia) appear to have anointed Peniel E. Joseph as the emerging Black scholar on Black Power and its aftermath – which is cause for dismay. Joseph “‘liberates’ Malcolm and Kwame from the events and ideas that shaped them and their own philosophical reflections upon them. At the same time he frees himself to do what he wishes with their legacies.”

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